Wood Shed Designs

Wood Shed Designs

With these free shed plans you'll be able to build the storage shed of your dreams without having to spend any money on the plans.The free shed plans below are available in a variety of styles such as gable, gambrel, and colonial and are designed for a variety of uses like for storage, tools, or even children's play areas. They'll help you build all sizes of sheds too, small to large.The free shed plans include step-by-step building directions to teach you how to build a shed, diagrams, photos, videos, materials lists, cutting lists, and shopping lists, so you can feel confident building a shed for your garden or backyard.Tip: Follow the directions on each website to download and print the free storage shed plans.Still in the building mood? Get free woodworking plans to build greenhouses, pergolas, garages, dog houses, potting benches, router tables, playhouses, cabins, tree houses, gazebos, porch swings, picnic tables, swing sets, deer stands, bookcases, home bars, wine racks, decks, work benches, chicken coops, bird houses, benches, and even homes.
wood shed designs 1

Wood Shed Designs

4 Free Shed Plan to Build a Simple Shed Scout You'll be able to build an attractive yet simple storage shed using this free shed plan. The shed will end up being 2 feet deep and 6 feet wide, which makes it perfect for a small space.A materials list, step-by-step directions, illustrations, and color photos are included in this free shed plan. More
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Wood Shed Designs

6 Free Shed Plan for a Schoolhouse Storage Shed The Family Handyman This free shed plan is for a storage plan in the style of a one room schoolhouse. It's a large shed at 10X12 ft. and has double doors, a covered entry, and fiber-cement siding.Step-by-step instructions and a tool and materials list are included in this free shed plan. More
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Wood Shed Designs

9 Free Shed Plan for a Simple Garden Shed Mother Earth News These free shed plans are for a simple garden shed that can be built with just basic carpentry skills.Detailed directions, a materials list, and blueprints are included in this free shed plan. More

Wood Shed Designs

Materials ListThe table lists major construction materials for four sizes of shed. Four-, six, and eight-inch square PT frame timbers are specified as much for their proportions and rugged good looks as for structural virtue. The raw material and true dimensions of square beams will vary, though any Building Code- or Pressure Treatment Association-approved PT lumber will be from structural-grade wood — usually Southern Yellow Pine in the East and Douglas Fir in the West. An eight-footer will measure at least that in length. But, a nominal six-inch-square beam can actually measure anywhere from 5’/” to 5%” a side. Size really doesn’t matter so long as the outer faces of all frame members are set in square and in the same plane so siding will go on evenly.Be sure your ground-level timbers at least are certified for Ground Contact (with tags or stamps reading “Ground Contact,” “.40CCA,” or “Treated to Rejection”). A lesser PT grade or untreated lumber is fine for the rest, but don’t waste time or money on rejects. Look the beams over carefully-sighting down each face lengthwise. Reject any that are warped, crooked, twisted, or that have large cracks, rot holes, or knots that seem to be working out. In particular, the beam that spans the front opening must be clear. If the lumber pile’s been picked through so thoroughly that only poor boards are left, demand that a new rick be unstrapped (or find another lumber yard). Again, be sure that each timber has at least one perfect surface to face outward and keep the siding fair. Siding boards want straight sides and no serious twists or warps, but loose knots will only increase good-drying air flow through the fuel wood.The most reasonably priced PT lumber is a bilious green from the copper in the rot-proofing, but will weather to a silvery gray where the rain hits it, and to a dark brown where it doesn’t. Or it can be stained or painted to match the shed siding.Constructing Your WoodshedHere, step-by-step, is how to build a basic 4 x 8 shed using simple (but challenging) butt, notch, and lap joints. See the illustrations and drawings for more elaborate joinery.The BaseFirst off, lay out your three base timbers, the 8′ rear beam, and the two 4′ side members in a long “U” shape. Snug down into the gravel with the most even sides up. Notch half laps (see photos) in upper face of the rear beam and the undersides of the side beams. Mate joints and with a protractor, carpenter’s angle, or equal length string across the diagonals, make sure the corners are perfect 90-degree angles. Snug timbers an inch or two down into the rock base. With a long board and a spirit level on top, make sure the base is level all around.You can fasten each joint with a triangle of six-penny galvanized nails or a single 6″ galvanized spike. Or, do it right and peg them. With a spade bit on the electric drill or a fine old wood bit on a brace or hand auger, drill one-inch diameter holes through the center of the corner laps and peg the joint by hammering in 6″ lengths of kiln-dried inch-diameter hardwood dowel. To make a simple but elegant vertical joint, cut 9″ dowels, sink them down 6″ and shave the up-protruding 3″ ends to points. Drill a 1 x 2 hole up into the centers of the vertical corner posts and hammer them down on the pegs.
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Wood Shed Designs

Scout You'll be able to build an attractive yet simple storage shed using this free shed plan. The shed will end up being 2 feet deep and 6 feet wide, which makes it perfect for a small space.A materials list, step-by-step directions, illustrations, and color photos are included in this free shed plan. More
wood shed designs 6

Wood Shed Designs

12 Garden Closet Storage Shed Plan The Family Handyman Here's a free shed plan for a very small shed that's only the size of a closet. It may be just what you're looking for though if you simply need a place to store some basic lawn equipment or gardening tools.A tools and materials list, step-by-step directions, diagrams, and plenty of pictures will help you build this shed. More
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Wood Shed Designs

13 Narrow Backyard Shed Plan BuildEazy Seven pages of shed plans will help you build a narrow (7 ft. wide by 4 ft. deep) shed for your backyard.A parts list, blueprints, and instructions will help you build this small but mighty shed. More
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22 7×8 Shed Plans This free shed plan will build you a 7 ft. x 8 ft. board-and-batten shed.Included in the free shed plan is a parts list, step-by-step instructions, and diagrams. More
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1 How to Build a Firewood Shed For me, heating with firewood is more about feeling self-sufficient than it is about lowering my utility bills. I also like cutting and splitting logs. It’s good exercise and the source of my wife’s wry nickname for me, the Saturday Lumberjack.But storing and keeping the wood dry is a hassle. Tarps can trap moisture, promote rot, and be difficult to remove after a snowfall. And stacking the wood inside is a poor choice, unless you enjoy the company of insects and mice.The solution is a simple shed. I designed the one you see above, which involves basic post-and-beam carpentry, to create an attractive storage unit for more than a cord. It keeps the wood from getting soggy and leaves the critters out in the cold, just where the Saturday Lumberjack likes them to be. Aaron Wojack 2 Build the Side Panels Crosscut the cedar slats and side supports to the lengths shown in the plans. Of the two supports on each side, the top one is shorter than the bottom one. This provides clearance to affix the beam.Next, notch the posts to receive the beam. Using a circular saw, make a shoulder cut and a series of cuts parallel to the shoulder, then remove the scored wood with a wide chisel. Smooth the notch’s face with a rasp. Aaron WojackAdvertisement – Continue Reading Below 3 Build the Side Panels To assemble the walls, place the cross supports on a flat surface, bore pilot holes, and attach the cross supports to the posts. Aaron Wojack 4 Build the Side Panels Then place the slats in position, apply a glob of construction adhesive, and screw the slats to the supports. Aaron WojackAdvertisement – Continue Reading Below 5 Set the Footings and Raise the Walls It’s important to accurately place the footings, or piers—it makes the build quicker and easier by preventing constant remeasuring and adjustment. We set the four corner piers in rough position and brought them into alignment with a string line. Then we used a tape measure to check the diagonals of this rectangle and to position the fifth and sixth piers relative to the perimeter. Aaron Wojack 6 Set the Footings and Raise the Walls Using a string level, we adjusted the height of the piers. Next, we placed the plastic end caps on the bottom of the posts and raised each wall on its piers. Aaron WojackAdvertisement – Continue Reading Below 7 Set the Footings and Raise the Walls We plumbed the walls and braced them diagonally to a stake driven into the ground. Aaron Wojack 8 Add Joists, Beams, and Posts Measure the distance between the walls, then crosscut the long joists and bolt them to the posts. Do the same with the beams.Measure the height from the center piers to their respective beams to determine the position of the shoulder cut on the center posts. Notch the two center posts, set them on their piers, plumb them, and bolt them into position.Crosscut the remaining joists and fasten them, as noted in the diagram, with joist hangers, joist hanger nails, 16d common nails, or 3½-inch deck screws. Crosscut the floor pieces and screw them to the long and short joists. Make yourself a small jig from scrap lumber to speed accurate spacing between each piece of flooring. Even better, make two. Place one at the front and another at the rear of each deck piece. Fasten the deck pieces with the jig in place. Lift the jigs out, position the next piece of decking, and repeat. Aaron WojackAdvertisement – Continue Reading Below 9 Add the Rafters To begin, make a pattern rafter from the best 2 x 4 on hand. Mark the angled plumb cuts at the top and bottom of the rafter and the position of the bird’s-mouth cuts (the notch where the rafter meets the beams). Clamp the rafter on top of the beams, check that the lines drawn are accurate, and adjust the lines as needed. Cut the rafters to length.Place the rafter on sawhorses and clamp it firmly in place. Make the vertical cut with a circular saw, use a chisel to notch the horizontal cut where the rafter rests on the beam, then turn the rafter back upright and finish the shallow horizontal notch with a chisel.Test-fit the pattern rafter and adjust its notches. When it fits accurately all along the beams, use it to mark and cut the remaining rafters. First, cut all the rafters to length. Then clamp together all the rafter stock, including the pattern rafter, edge up. Mark and cut all of the notches to match the pattern rafter. Use a chisel to finish each notch. Aaron Wojack 10 Add the Rafters Mark the position of the rafters along the beams at 16-inch centers and carefully nail them in place. We even went so far as to set each nailhead to firmly pinch the rafter down against the beam. We nailed the front fascia in place and moved on to the skip sheathing for the roofing. Note that two pieces of sheathing are nailed on at the peak and at the base. The rest are spaced evenly between them. Aaron Wojack